A skin cancer victim has shared a shocking picture of the scar on her face to warn of the horrific damage sunbeds can cause. Lorraine Henderson, 40, was diagnosed with skin cancer after she regularly used sunbeds and refused to wear sun cream from the age of 13. The mother-of-one has now revealed the huge painful scar caused by her tanning addiction in a bid to warn others of the dangers.

The shocking picture has been shared more than 3,600 times on Facebook, with users praising Ms Henderson for her brave decision. Damage: Lorraine Henderson, 40, was diagnosed with skin cancer after she regularly used sunbeds and refused to wear sun cream from the age of 13. She has now revealed the huge painful scar caused by her tanning addiction in a bid to warn others of the dangers and her post has already been shared 3,600 times

The payroll worker, from Livingston, West Lothian, had a spot on her face for a year before a friend told her to consult a doctor about it. She said: I thought it was just a spot on my face. It was coming up to summer and I thought, the sun will help clear it up. But as time went on, she noticed the blemish wasnt disappearing, so sought medical help. The doctor took one look at it and said it’s skin cancer, she recalled. I was quite taken aback. It hadn’t crossed my mind at all. She added: For years I abused my skin, not putting the proper sun cream on from the age of about 13.

I’d go on holiday and get the best tan I could, then come back and really hit the sunbeds to keep my colour up.Warning: Ms Henderson had spot on her face for a year before a friend told her to consult a doctor about it. The skin cancer has left a permanent scar Seeing that big scar on my face really hit home about abusing my skin. I don’t think there’s enough warnings out there about sunbeds. Ms Henderson, who has now had surgery to remove the growth, admits she also only ever used baby oil when abroad, to get the deepest tan possible.

She also went on sunbeds for up to nine minutes at a time, opting for the high impact setting to get the best tan she could.  I had a spot on my face for over a yr then thinking the sun wld clear it up and didn’t, a gd friend advised me 2 get this checked out in which I did one look and was told I had skin cancer.She added: Not lking 4 any sympathy comments, wld jst like 2 put out there that after years of abusing sunbeds not putting the proper sun cream on has resulted in a permanent scar on my face.

BE AWARE. SUNBEDS, SUN, DOES LEAVE PERMANENT DAMAGE!!

Finally, she said: I didn’t realise there was going to be such a frenzy about it. I would just stay clear of sun beds I’ll be wearing factor 50 [from now on]. That’s something I’ve never even done.” Since sharing her pictures and story on Facebook, Ms Henderson has been inundated with messages from well wishers. John Toal said: Lorraine, such a brave thing to do and raising awareness of something most take for granted, I hope your feeling better now that you’ve had spot/cancer removed.

Michelle Carlyon Reid posted: Firstly I’m so sorry you had to go through this and secondly well done for being so honest and raising awareness. Sun damage is deadly. I’m so glad they caught it in time. Sending you big courageous hugs lady. Skin cancer affects around 113,000 people and claims almost 2,800 lives per year in the UK alone, according to the charity Cancer Research UK.The chances of contracting skin cancer are heightened by the use of ultra-violet tanning devices as well as solar radiation, experts warn.

The disease is linked to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light which is emitted by the sun and sunbeds.

So lethal are tanning booths that the World Health Organisation has classified them as dangerous as cigarettes and they are listed as one of the most dangerous cancer-causing habits.

Research has previously found that a using a sunbed before the age of 35 increases the risk of malignant melanoma by nearly 90 per cent.

And 10-minute session on a sunbed is twice as likely to cause skin cancer as spending the same amount of time in the midday sun in the Mediterranean.

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